La Niña becomes weak; February the globe's 14th-17th warmest on record

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:48 PM GMT en Marzo 22, 2011

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The equatorial waters of the Eastern Pacific off the coast of South America have steadily warmed during March, and it appears increasingly likely that the current La Niña event will be over by June. This week, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) over the tropical Eastern Pacific in the area 5°N - 5°S, 120°W - 170°W, also called the "Niña 3.4 region", warmed to 0.8°C below average, according to NOAA. This puts the current La Niña in the "weak" category for the first time since the event began in July 2010. If these SSTs continue to warm such that they are no more than 0.5°C below average, the La Niña event will be over, and we will be in "neutral" conditions. An animation of SSTs since late November shows this developing warmth nicely. Springtime is the most common time for a La Niña event to end; since 1950, half of all La Niñas ended in March, April, or May. The weakness displayed by the current La Niña event has prompted NOAA's Climate Prediction Center to predict that La Niña will be gone by June. As La Niña continues to wane, we can expect that rainfall over the drought regions of the southern U.S. will gradually return to normal levels by mid-summer.


Figure 1. Latest runs of the long-range El Niño models have 5 predictions for La Niña conditions during hurricane season, 7 for neutral conditions, and 5 for El Niño. Image credit: IRI.

Impact on hurricane season
It is well-known that when an El Niño event is in place, a significant reduction in Atlantic hurricane activity results due to an increase in wind shear. With La Niña likely gone by June, what are the chances of having El Niño in place by the August-September-October peak of hurricane season? Well, our long-range El Niño models do a poor job of making accurate predictions in the spring, a phenomena known as the "spring predictability barrier." True to form, the March predictions by these models are all over the place (Figure 1.) There are 5 predictions for La Niña conditions being present during the upcoming hurricane season, 7 predictions for neutral conditions, and 5 predictions for El Niño. If we look at past history, since 1950, there have been six La Niña events that ended in the spring. During the subsequent hurricane season, two of those years experienced El Niño conditions: 1951 (10 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 5 intense hurricanes) and 1976 (10 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 2 intense hurricanes.) The other four years had neutral conditions during hurricane season. These years were 1968 (8 named storms, 5 hurricanes, 0 intense hurricanes), 1989 (11 named storms, 7 hurricanes, 2 intense hurricanes); 1996 (13 named storms, 9 hurricanes, 6 intense hurricanes); and 2008 (16 named storms, 9 hurricanes, and 5 intense hurricanes.) An average hurricane season has 10 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 2 intense hurricanes. So, three of these six analogue years had five or more intense hurricanes (including one of the El Niño years). Looking at sea surface temperature in the hurricane main development region (MDR), the stretch of ocean between the coast of Africa and Central America, including the Caribbean, February temperatures this year were 0.62°C above average, the 7th highest February anomaly since the late 1800s. Of the six analogue years since 1950 when La Niña ended in spring, only 1996 had a much above average February SST anomaly in the MDR (0.61°C.) Thus, I believe it is a reasonable speculation at this point to predict this year's hurricane season will be similar to 1996, with its 13 named storms, 9 hurricanes, and 6 intense hurricanes--assuming we end up with neutral and not El Niño conditions this fall.


Figure 2. Departure of temperature from average for February 2011. Image credit: National Climatic Data Center (NCDC).

February 2011: 14th - 17th warmest on record for the globe
February 2011 was the globe's 17th warmest February on record, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies rated February the 14th warmest on record. February 2011 global ocean temperatures were the 10th warmest on record, and land temperatures were the 28th warmest on record. Global satellite-measured temperatures for the lowest 8 km of the atmosphere were average, the 14th or 17th coolest in the 34-year record, according to Remote Sensing Systems and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH). The global cool-down from November, which was the warmest November on record for the globe, was due in large part to the moderate strength La Niña episode in the Eastern Pacific. The large amount of cold water that upwells to the surface during a La Niña typically causes a substantial cool-down in global temperatures. The coldest places on the globe in February, relative to average, were Eastern Europe and northeastern Siberia. Central Africa, central China, and western Greenland were exceptionally warm. For the contiguous U.S., February temperatures were near average, ranking the 51st coldest in the 117-year record, according to the National Climatic Data Center. Precipitation was also near average, ranking as the 41st driest February since 1895. February 2011 Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent was tied for the lowest on record in February, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Satellite records extend back to 1979. This is the third consecutive month of record low Arctic sea ice cover.

Mostly offshore winds expected over Japan through Thursday
Radioactive plumes emitted from Japan's troubled Fukushima nuclear power plant will mostly head to the south today, passing just east of Tokyo. Northerly winds wrapping around the back side of an area of low pressure moving out to sea to the east are responsible for this pattern. As high pressure builds in over the next few days, mostly offshore winds will carry radiation from the Fukushima plant out to sea. This should change on Friday, when an approaching low pressure system will once again bring northeasterly onshore winds to Japan, possibly blowing heightened levels of radioactivity into Tokyo.


Figure 3. One-day forecast movement of plumes of radioactive air emitted at 10 meters altitude (red line) and 100 meters (blue line) at 18 UTC (2pm EDT) Tuesday, March 22, 2011 from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. Mostly offshore winds are predicted to keep the plumes east of Tokyo. Image created using NOAA's HYSPLIT trajectory model.


Figure 4. One-day forecast movement of plumes of radioactive air emitted at 10 meters altitude (red line) and 100 meters (blue line) at 18 UTC (2pm EDT) Wednesday, March 23, 2011 from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. Offshore winds are predicted to carry radioactivity away from Japan. Image created using NOAA's HYSPLIT trajectory model.

Resources
The Miami Herald has an interesting article discussing how Japan's earthquake caused a 3-inch jump in ground water levels in South Florida 34 minutes after the quake struck on March 11.

Seven-day weather forecast for Sendai near the Fukushima nuclear plant

The Austrian Weather Service is running trajectory models for Japan.

Spring is here, and wunderground has set up an eCard to send messages to friends and family celebrating the arrival of spring.

My next post will probably be on Thursday.
Jeff Masters

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Thanks Grothar. I guess that is my sign to go to bed.

I have a hectic 7 day period coming up, so if u don't see me it's not because I don't love u guys anymore.... lol

Night all.
Member Since: Octubre 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 20742
Quoting Chicklit:




okay, math whizzes figure this one out, please!
SeawaterSaltConcentrations

Where is atmoaggie when you need him?!


I'm sure he's looking up in Wiki, as we speak. LOL
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Quoting pottery:

Interesting...
But will someone do the Math here, and say how much sea water is needed (even if ALL of it boils away) to create 99,000 lb. of salt?

Then double that, cos it's 2 reactors and add 57,000 lb again for the other one....

Sounds unlikely, to me..




okay, math whizzes figure this one out, please!
SeawaterSaltConcentrations

Where is atmoaggie when you need him?!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting BahaHurican:
Anybody else still having problems with the blog presentation in views other than 50 messages?


Yes, except it seems, those with Mac's and Firefox. I guess I'll have to get rid of my Windows 3.1 and Explorer 1.1 and upgrade someday. I couldn't get on for about 3 hours.
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Anybody else still having problems with the blog presentation in views other than 50 messages?
Member Since: Octubre 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 20742
Quoting Neapolitan:

Yeah, great for business. Not so great for the people of Japan. But then again, corporations are all about profit, so they never did care much about people anyway, did they?

The status quo is maintained.


If you elect businessmen to run government (Florida governor for example) and privatize our public schools, do you think the public will get more and better services or less? Will we be safer and healthier or more at risk?
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Quoting Grothar:


Moving on!!!


Like I said, FAMILY BLOG!!!!!!
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Quoting Patrap:

I heard we're getting some, but not until next week.


"Must resist retort ,,must be strong"..


I was, notice my response earlier.
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Quoting Chicklit:
Evening, this is from the New York Times article Watching This One just posted:

Nuclear engineers have become increasingly concerned about a separate problem that may be putting pressure on the Japanese technicians to work faster: salt buildup inside the reactors, which could cause them to heat up more and, in the worst case, cause the uranium to melt, releasing a range of radioactive material.

Richard T. Lahey Jr., who was General Electric’s chief of safety research for boiling-water reactors when the company installed them at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, said that as seawater was pumped into the reactors and boiled away, it left more and more salt behind.

He estimates that 57,000 pounds of salt have accumulated in Reactor No. 1 and 99,000 pounds apiece in Reactors No. 2 and 3, which are larger.

The big question is how much of that salt is still mixed with water and how much now forms a crust on the uranium fuel rods.

Crusts insulate the rods from the water and allow them to heat up. If the crusts are thick enough, they can block water from circulating between the fuel rods. As the rods heat up, their zirconium cladding can rupture, which releases gaseous radioactive iodine inside, and may even cause the uranium to melt and release much more radioactive material.


Interesting...
But will someone do the Math here, and say how much sea water is needed (even if ALL of it boils away) to create 99,000 lb. of salt?

Then double that, cos it's 2 reactors and add 57,000 lb again for the other one....

Sounds unlikely, to me..
Member Since: Octubre 24, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 23094
Quoting Patrap:

I heard we're getting some, but not until next week.


"Must resist retort ,,must be strong"..


FAMILY BLOG YOU TWO!!!!!!! LOL

I knew Grothar would get it first LOL
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

I heard we're getting some, but not until next week.


"Must resist retort ,,must be strong"..
Member Since: Julio 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125681
Quoting jeffs713:

I will see your drought monitor post, and raise you by a South Central US.



Oh, yeah. Well I raise you this. LOL


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IAEA Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident Update (23 March, 20:00 UTC)

Brief update on state of Fukushima Daiichi reactors
Member Since: Julio 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125681
Quoting caneswatch:


I heard we're getting some, but not until next week.
Quoting caneswatch:


I heard we're getting some, but not until next week.


Moving on!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
If Caneswatch is still on what I mean by out is that you were on the blog.And were blogging.
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Evening, this is from the New York Times article Watching This One just posted:

Nuclear engineers have become increasingly concerned about a separate problem that may be putting pressure on the Japanese technicians to work faster: salt buildup inside the reactors, which could cause them to heat up more and, in the worst case, cause the uranium to melt, releasing a range of radioactive material.

Richard T. Lahey Jr., who was General Electric’s chief of safety research for boiling-water reactors when the company installed them at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, said that as seawater was pumped into the reactors and boiled away, it left more and more salt behind.

He estimates that 57,000 pounds of salt have accumulated in Reactor No. 1 and 99,000 pounds apiece in Reactors No. 2 and 3, which are larger.

The big question is how much of that salt is still mixed with water and how much now forms a crust on the uranium fuel rods.

Crusts insulate the rods from the water and allow them to heat up. If the crusts are thick enough, they can block water from circulating between the fuel rods. As the rods heat up, their zirconium cladding can rupture, which releases gaseous radioactive iodine inside, and may even cause the uranium to melt and release much more radioactive material.

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Quoting Grothar:


What about South Florida? We're drier than you.


I will see your drought monitor post, and raise you by a South Central US.

Member Since: Agosto 3, 2008 Posts: 16 Comments: 5793
Quoting Grothar:


What about South Florida? We're drier than you.



I heard we're getting some, but not until next week.
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Quoting aquak9:
hi ya'll

will someone please send some rain to Florida, esp the east-central and northeastern areas. No, not the severe stuff, that'll come mid, late April. Right now, I just want some rain.

Please.


What about South Florida? We're drier than you.

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762. xcool
BP workers are sick and dying from COREXIT! This woman is suffering from a lot of issues including neurological damage. I know a lot is going on right now, but let's give a voice to the clean up crew whos ailments are being ignored! [video]


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZc9fwTAz_k&featur e=player_embedded#at=34
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706 PlazaRed "I just looked back over the last few days and was wondering what might have happened last night about 24 hours ago on the east coast of Japan.:-
MAP 5.1 2011/03/22 22:53:31 37.062 140.620 27.9 EASTERN HONSHU, JAPAN
MAP 5.0 2011/03/22 22:51:38 36.924 142.333 30.1 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
MAP 5.4 2011/03/22 22:36:33 37.078 140.561 15.7 EASTERN HONSHU, JAPAN
MAP 5.7 2011/03/22 22:12:29 37.109 140.673 1.0 EASTERN HONSHU, JAPAN
...the above data must have raised a few eyebrows around the world...
...all this activity takes place over about 40 minutes!
"

As mentioned in page5comment213 along with accompanying map, JMA found that three quakes epicentered between 29to35miles southwest of the FukushimaDaiichi powerplants to be sufficiently interesting to call a press conference.
Other than NHK coverage of the JapaneseMeteorologicalAgency briefing, not much reaction, neither here nor in the media presence on the WorldWideWeb.

It's been 12hours now since the last quake of magnitude5-or-greater has been reported.
Could just be a page-renewal-cookie glitch in either my machine or at the USGS...
...but after getting used to such a long&sustained period of frequent 5s&up, I find myself waiting for the other shoe to drop with a !KABOOM!(even though intellectually I know things hafta quiet down soon).
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M-Class Flare - An M1.4 Solar Flare took place at 02:18 UTC Wednesday around Sunspot 1176 which is located towards the southeast limb.There will remain the chance for further M-Class activity.


Eastern Limb Prominences by Ron Cottrell in Oro Valley, Arizona (Tuesday)

Member Since: Julio 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125681
The nuclear emergency is not over.

Worth reading, unless you are looking for something light.

NYT - New Problems at Japanese Plant Subdue Optimism
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
next active period approaches

here is a back side view of sun
four to come in this next period

Quite lovely and useful graphic, thank you.
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Wildfire near McClellanville...north of Charleston
Link
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BTW, if you have not, check for updated patches for your OS and browser, and update them accordingly. There have been a number of recent issues that prompted the updates that have come out recently.
Member Since: Junio 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
Thanks, Pat. For some reason, pink dinosaurs used to work, too. Ah well, each time is different.
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Member Since: Julio 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125681
hi ya'll

will someone please send some rain to Florida, esp the east-central and northeastern areas. No, not the severe stuff, that'll come mid, late April. Right now, I just want some rain.

Please.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:



coming about


Sol had some comets over for dinner, and they were not guests :)



http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/item.php?id=s elects&iid=148

Member Since: Junio 12, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 8183
Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident Update (23 March, 20:00 UTC)

Brief update on state of Fukushima Daiichi reactors

Japanese authorities today announced a number of developments at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, where reactor cooling systems were disabled following the massive earthquake and tsunami on 11 March.

At Units 1, 2, 3, and 4, workers have advanced the restoration of off-site electricity, and the lights are working in Unit 3's main control room.

Black smoke was seen emerging from the Unit 3 reactor building, spurring the temporary evacuation of workers from Units 3 and 4. The emission of smoke has now decreased significantly.

Crews continued today to use a concrete pump truck to deliver high volumes of water into the Unit 4 spent fuel pool, where there are concerns of inadequate water coverage over the fuel assemblies.

At Units 5 and 6, workers have successfully restored off-site power to the reactor, which had previously reached a safe, cold shutdown status.
Briefing on Fukushima Nuclear Accident (23 March 2011, 15:30 UTC)

On Wednesday, 23 March 2011, Graham Andrew, Special Adviser to the IAEA Director General on Scientific and Technical Affairs, briefed both Member States and the media on the current status of nuclear safety in Japan. His opening remarks, which he delivered at 15:30 UTC at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna, are provided below:

* There are some positive developments related to the availability of electrical power supply to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants, although the overall situation remains of serious concern.
* AC power is now available at Units 1, 2 and 4. Power has been restored to some instrumentation in all Units except Unit 3. At Unit 3, the main control room has lighting, but no power to its equipment or instruments. As a positive development instrumentation, as it becomes available, is providing more data that can be assessed by experts.
* The pressure in the reactor pressure vessel and drywell of Unit 3 is stable. However, pressure has increased in both the reactor pressure vessel and the drywell of Unit 1, where seawater injection has been increased. Until heat can be removed from Unit 1, pressure tends to increase as water is injected. The reactor feed water system is being used, in addition to water injection through fire extinguisher lines.
* Pressure readings in Unit 2 appear to be less reliable. Only limited data is available concerning the reactor pressure vessel and reactor containment vessels' integrity of Unit 2. Temperature readings in the reactor pressure vessels of Units 1 and 3 were high and of some concern. The temperature has now dropped in Unit 1 following the start of seawater injection via feed-water pipes. Indications are that the temperature at Unit 2 is stable.
* Units 5 and 6 continue to have off-site power and remain in cold shutdown.
* Dose rates measured in the containment vessels and suppression chambers of Units 1, 2, and 3 are available and are being studied.
* Periodic water spraying of Units 2, 3, and 4 and the common spent fuel pool has continued.

Radiation Monitoring

The IAEA radiation monitoring team took additional measurements at distances from 30 to 73 km from the Fukushima nuclear power plant. Results from gamma dose-rate measurements in air ranged from 0.2 to 6.9 microsievert per hour. The beta-gamma contamination measurements ranged from 0.02 to 0.6 Megabecquerel per square metre.

The second IAEA monitoring team has now arrived in Japan. The two teams in Japan will continue to work closely with the Japanese authorities. Monitoring will be undertaken in the areas of Fukushima and Tokyo. Measurements will be taken to determine more precisely the actual composition of the radionuclides that have been deposited.

More data has become available from the Japanese authorities. The measurements indicate that the radiation dose rates at the Daiichi site are decreasing. Absent further releases from the site, this is to be expected as relatively short lived radionuclides such as Iodine-131 decay away. At the Daiini site, small spikes have been observed in gamma dose rate measurements; these are most likely to be the result of releases carried by the wind from the nearby Daiichi site.

The deposition of iodine-131 and caesium-137 varies across some ten Prefectures from day to day, but the trend is generally upward. In contrast, environmental radiation monitoring data in the Fukushima Prefecture outside the 20km evacuation zone, shows mostly decreasing values.

Monitoring of the marine environment is being undertaken by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology (MEXT). High levels of iodine-131 and caesium-137 were measured close to the effluent discharge points Units 1 to 4 of Fukushima Daiichi (i.e. before dilution by the ocean). Future monitoring will cover eight locations 30 km off the coast at 10 km intervals. Results for seawater and the atmosphere above the sea should be available in the next few days. IAEA experts from the Marine Environment Laboratory, Monaco will assess this data.

Since yesterday, the IAEA has received further information from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare regarding the presence of radioactivity in milk, drinking water and vegetables. The results of some samples were above the limits specified in Japanese regulations concerning limits for food and water ingestion.

In Fukushima prefecture six raw milk samples, and in Ibaraki prefecture three spinach samples, showed concentrations of Iodine-131 in excess of limits. We understand that the Prime Minister of Japan, Mr. Naoto Kan, has today issued instructions to food business operators to cease, for the time being, the distribution of, and for the public to cease the consumption of, certain leafy vegetables (e.g., spinach, komatsuna, cabbages) and any flowerhead brassicas (broccoli, cauliflower) produced in Fukushima Prefecture. The Prime Minister has ordered food business operators not to distribute, for the time being, any fresh raw milk and parsley in Ibaraki Prefecture.

We have also been advised that the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has encouraged Ibaraki and Chiba Prefectures to monitor seafood products.

The Tokyo Metropolitan Water Office stated that levels of iodine-131 in tap water at a purification plant were found to be above the limits for drinking water for infants but below the level for adults. The Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare, has requested that tap water in Tokyo is not used as drinking water for infants.

So, in summary: there are some positive indications on the site; precautionary restrictions around the site on certain foodstuffs; and monitoring of the environment is continuing beyond the evacuation zone and at sea. No significant risk to human health has been identified.

→ Watch Video :: View Presentation
Fukushima Nuclear Accident Update (23 March 2011, 01:10 UTC)

Restoring Power to Fukushima Daiichi

Without electrical power, cooling systems at Fukushima Daiichi's six reactors cannot operate. Many of the problems facing the nuclear power plant stem from the loss of electrical power at the site following the massive earthquake and tsunami on 11 March. The earthquake cut off external power to the plant and the tsunami disabled backup diesel generators.

Japanese officials have been working to restore power to the facility, and their efforts are organized in three phases.

Units 1 and 2

Reactor cooling systems at these units are severely hampered. There is suspected damage to the nuclear fuel in both units. Workers successfully connected off-site electrical supplies to a transformer at Unit 2 on 19 March and later to at least one electrical distribution panel inside the plant. Technicians are conducting diagnostic tests to determine the integrity of the reactor's electrical systems.

Japanese authorities plan to connect Unit 1 sometime after Unit 2. Because of the degraded condition of the Unit 1 reactor building, this work may take more time compared to Unit 2, the reactor building sustained significantly less damage since the earthquake struck.

Units 3 and 4

Reactor cooling systems at Unit 3 are severely hampered. There is suspected damage to the reactor's fuel, and the condition of its spent fuel pool is uncertain. Unit 4 had been shut down for routine maintenance - and all its fuel was removed to the reactor building's spent fuel pool - prior to the earthquake. There is therefore no concern about fuel in the reactor core, but considerable concern about the fuel in the spent fuel pool.

Workers are moving toward restoring electricity to both units, but their progress is uncertain.

Units 5 and 6

Both units had been shut down for routine maintenance prior to the earthquake, reducing their cooling needs somewhat, but not entirely. On 17 March operators were able to start one of the Unit 6 diesel generators. On 19 March, workers successfully connected the second diesel generator in Unit 6. The two generators were used to power cooling systems in both reactors, which then achieved a safe, cold shutdown configuration. Off-site power was restored to Unit 5 on 21 March.

Restoring external power to the power plant does not mean the reactors will immediately resume normal safety function. The earthquake and tsunami may have inflicted considerable damage in addition to knocking out electricity supplies. Since the extent of this damage (and therefore the extent of necessary repair) is unknown, it is not possible to accurately estimate a work schedule. Progress of efforts to restore power may be impaired by heavy gloves or respirators required to permit the operators to work in the reactors following the damage inflicted by the earthquake and tsunami.

As power is restored, workers will perform checks to make certain the conditions are safe to restart individual components. They will check for grounds and ensure circuits remain intact. If damage is discovered, a decision will have to be made whether to perform repairs or move on to the next component on a prioritised list. Nuclear reactors, especially safety related equipment, incorporate multiple layers of redundancy. So a problem in one component does not necessarily mean a specific safety function will be unrecoverable. It is more likely that operators will move on to the redundant equipment in an effort to determine the most intact system and focus their restoration efforts there. This process takes time.
Member Since: Julio 3, 2005 Posts: 415 Comments: 125681
And I'll see your out and raise you a far out.
Member Since: Agosto 22, 2008 Posts: 12 Comments: 6010
Quoting caneswatch:


What do you mean "out?"


Not in?
Member Since: Agosto 22, 2008 Posts: 12 Comments: 6010
Quoting washingtonian115:
CanesWatch I see your out.


What do you mean "out?"
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Quoting caneswatch:


It won't be boring next week.
CanesWatch I see your out.
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743. Skyepony (Mod)
Situation Update No. 46
On 23.03.2011 at 04:25 GMT+2

The death toll in the Japanese earthquake and tsunami grew to more than 9,300 in the past 24 hours. According to Japan's National Police Agency data, 9,301 people were killed and 12,645 remain unaccounted for as of 09:00 local time (00:00 GMT). A fresh tremor measuring 6.6 rattled Japan's northeastern Fukushima prefecture on Tuesday, the strongest so far in a series of aftershocks following the 9.0-magnitude March 11 earthquake. More than 160 Russian rescuers, who worked in the worst damaged Japanese cities of Sendai and Niigata, have been returning to Russia on Tuesday and Wednesday.
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Quoting Grothar:
Another boring week down here in Ft. Lauderdale.



It won't be boring next week.
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Quoting EYEStoSEA:


Now what does that mean? and where is the radar?
next active period approaches

here is a back side view of sun
four to come in this next period
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:



coming about


Mister Keeper,
Not to want to bore you but what do you make of this yesterday?

MAP 5.1 2011/03/22 22:53:31 37.062 140.620 27.9 EASTERN HONSHU, JAPAN
MAP 5.0 2011/03/22 22:51:38 36.924 142.333 30.1 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
MAP 5.4 2011/03/22 22:36:33 37.078 140.561 15.7 EASTERN HONSHU, JAPAN
MAP 5.7 2011/03/22 22:12:29 37.109 140.673 1.0 EASTERN HONSHU, JAPAN

It does seem a bit concentrated!

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Quoting HurricaneDean07:
That History shows that the U.S might indeed be in danger.I hope history doesn't "repeat" it's self to say the least.
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:



coming about


Now what does that mean? and where is the radar?
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coming about
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Quoting Neapolitan:

Yeah, great for business. Not so great for the people of Japan. But then again, corporations are all about profit, so they never did care much about people anyway, did they?

The status quo is maintained.


I think we have to bear in mind with these kind of things that the truth as they wish to convey it may be meaningless, as the consequences of their actions and fibs will come out and we are not dealing with a western society here who will blindly accept any old story just to get the soap operas back on the 'idiot box'

Added to all the 'stories so far' we also have to consider that this might only be the beginning of the next chapter of uncharted and uncontrollable demise?
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733. beell
click for storm reports

Member Since: Septiembre 11, 2007 Posts: 137 Comments: 15352
Quoting Grothar:


Uh-OH!


Well, all I have to do is pull my left earlobe to the right....just a little bit.....and everything works just perfect. /)
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Quoting beell:


In this case, the truth appears to be the best business decision...
;-)

Yeah, great for business. Not so great for the people of Japan. But then again, corporations are all about profit, so they never did care much about people anyway, did they?

The status quo is maintained.
Member Since: Noviembre 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13292

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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