Paula dying; Zambia records its hottest temperature in history

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 12:35 PM GMT en Octubre 15, 2010

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There's not much left of Tropical Depression Paula, which continues to weaken as wind shear of 35 - 40 knots tears the storm apart. Satellite imagery shows Paula has the classic appearance of a storm experiencing high wind shear--a low-level center exposed to view, with all the heavy thunderstorm activity pushed to the northeast side by powerful upper-level winds from the southwest. Paula caused only minor flooding and very little damage in Mexico, Cuba, and the Florida Keys. Considering that most Category 2 hurricanes that pass through the Yucatan Channel end up getting their names retired, we got very fortunate with Paula. Havana, Cuba reported sustained winds of 41 mph, gusting to 54, at 7pm local time last night, and received heavy rain that caused moderate street flooding. The wind and rain knocked out power to most of the city and felled over 400 trees. Some isolated heavy rains affected the Florida Keys, with Key West picking up 1.40" inches of rain. Paula will bring some heavy rain showers to Andros Island in the Bahamas today, but the storm is not likely to cause any more flooding problems. High wind shear should be able to completely destroy Paula by Saturday morning.


Figure 1. Visible MODIS image from NASA's Terra satellite of Paula at 12:05pm EDT October 14, 2010, as Paula was approaching Havana, Cuba. Image credit: NASA.

New Caribbean disturbance
Heavy thunderstorm activity is currently limited over the southern Caribbean waters just north of Panama, but the latest 2am EDT (6Z) NOGAPS and GFS model runs continue to predict the formation of a tropical depression in the region 4 - 5 days from now. The storm is predicted to move northwest or northwards towards the Cayman Islands and Jamaica once it forms. The GFS model has been pretty reliable in forecasting the genesis of new tropical depressions this year, and the fact that we have two major models predicting the formation of a new Caribbean tropical depression next week is worth paying attention to.

Typhoon Megi
In the Western Pacific, Typhoon Megi has attained Category 2 strength, and is predicted to intensify into a 150 mph supertyphoon that will strike the northern Philippine Island of Luzon on Sunday night or Monday morning. If this forecast verifies, Megi would be the strongest tropical cyclone to strike land globally in 2010. The globe has had an unusually low number of landfalling major hurricanes this year. Only one Category 4 or stronger storm has hit land--Tropical Cyclone Tomas, which hit Fiji on March 15 as a Category 4 storm with 135 mph winds. Tomas killed 3 people and did $45 million in damage to Fiji, and was the strongest storm to hit Fiji since Cyclone Bebe in 1972. The only other major tropical cyclones in 2010 to make landfall were Tropical Cyclone Oli, which passed through French Polynesia on February 5 as a Category 3 storm; Tropical Cyclone Rene, which hit Tonga in the South Pacific as a Category 3 storm on February 15; Typhoon Fanapi, which hit Taiwan on September 19 as a Category 3 storm; and Hurricane Karl, which hit Mexico near Verzcruz on September 17 as a Category 3 hurricane.

Zambia hits an all-time record 42.4°C (108.3°F)
Zambia recorded its hottest temperature in history Wednesday, October 13, when the mercury hit 42.4°C (108.3°F) in Mfuwe. The previous record was 42.3°C (108.1°F) set on November 17, 2005 in Mfuwe. Zambia is near the Equator, and the timing of the rainy season and dry season determines when all-time maximum and minimum temperatures can be set. It turns out that the months of September, October, and November mark a transition period into Zambia's rainy season, and are the only months of the year that all-time record high temperatures are likely to occur (thanks go to Maximiliano Herrera for pointing this out.) Zambia is the 18th nation to record a hottest all-time temperature this year, which is a new record. The year 2007 is in second place, with 15 such records. No nations have recorded an all-time coldest temperature so far this year; I regret erroneously reporting earlier in my blog that Guinea had done so. Guinea actually had its coldest temperature in history last year, on January 9, 2009, when the mercury hit 1.4°C (34.5°F) at Mali-ville in the Labe region. The full updated list of national heat records set in 2010 is below; my source for extreme weather records is the excellent book Extreme Weather by Christopher C. Burt, who is now a featured blogger on wunderground. I thank Chris and weather record researchers Maximiliano Herrera and Howard Rainford for their assistance identifying this year's new extreme temperature records.


Figure 2. Climate Central put together a nice graphic showing the nations that have set new extreme heat records in 2010, which I've updated to include Zambia.

National heat records set in 2010
Bolivia tied its all-time hottest temperature mark on October 29, when the mercury hit 46.7°C (116.1°F) at Villamontes. This ties the record set in Villamontes on three other dates: November 9, 2007, November 1980, and December 1980.

Zambia recorded its hottest temperature in history Wednesday, October 13, when the mercury hit 42.4°C (108.3°F) in Mfuwe. The previous record was 42.3°C (108.1°F) set on November 17, 2005 in Mfuwe.

Belarus recorded its hottest temperature in its history on August 6, 2010, when the mercury hit 38.9°C (102.0°F) in Gorky. The previous record was 38.0°C (100.4°F) set at Vasiliyevichy on Aug. 20, 1946.

Ukraine recorded its hottest temperature in its history when the mercury hit 42.0°C (107.6°F) at Lukhansk on August 12, 2010. The previous record was set at the same location on August 1, 2010--41.3°C (106.3°F). Ukraine also reached 41.3°C on July 20 and 21, 2007, at Voznesensk.

Cyprus recorded its hottest temperature in its history on August 1, 2010 when the mercury hit 46.6°C (115.9°F) at Lefconica. The old record for Cyprus was 44.4°C (111.9°F) at Lefkosia in August 1956. An older record of 46.6°C from July 1888 was reported from Nicosia, but is of questionable reliability.

Finland recorded its hottest temperature on July 29, 2010, when the mercury hit 37.2°C (99°F) at Joensuu. The old (undisputed) record was 95°F (35°C) at Jyvaskyla on July 9, 1914. The previous official record was 35.9°C at Turku in July 1914, but this reading has been disputed by weather records researcher Maximiliano Herrera as being unreliable due improper siting of the instrument too close to tall buildings.

Qatar had its hottest temperature in history on July 14, 2010, when the mercury hit 50.4°C (122.7°F) at Doha Airport. The previous record was 49.6°C in July 2000 at the same location. There are other stations in Qatar,but only the Doha International Airport has reliable data.

Russia had its hottest temperature in history on July 12, when the mercury rose to 45.4°C (113.7°F) at the Utta hydrological station in the Kalmykia Republic, in the European portion of Russia near the Kazakhstan border. This station is not under control of the Russian meteorological service, and may not be 100% reliable. A reading of 44.0°C (111.2°F) was also recorded in Yashkul, Kalmykia Republic, on July 11. The previous hottest temperature in Russia (not including the former Soviet republics) at a non-automated station was the 43.8°C (110.8°F) reading measured at Alexander Gaj, Kalmykia Republic, on August 6, 1940. The previous hottest temperature at an automated station was 45.0°C recorded in August 1940 at El'ton. The remarkable heat in Russia this year has not been limited just to the European portion of the country--the Asian portion of Russia also recorded its hottest temperature in history this year, a 42.7°C (108.9°F) reading at Ust Kara, in the Chita Republic on June 27. The 42.3°C (108.1°F) reading on June 25 at Belogorsk, near the Amur River border with China, also beat the old record for the Asian portion of Russia. The previous record for the Asian portion of Russia was 41.7°C (107.1°F) at Aksha on July 21, 2004.

Sudan recorded its hottest temperature in its history on June 22 when the mercury rose to 49.7°C (121.5°F) at Dongola. The previous record was 49.5°C (121.1°F) set in July 1987 in Aba Hamed.

Niger tied its record for hottest day in history on June 22, 2010, when the temperature reached 47.1°C (116.8°F) at Bilma. That record stood for just one day, as Bilma broke the record again on June 23, when the mercury topped out at 48.2°C (118.8°F). The previous record was 47.1°C on May 24, 1998, also at Bilma.

Saudi Arabia had its hottest temperature ever on June 22, 2010, with a reading of 52.0°C (125.6°F) in Jeddah, the second largest city in Saudi Arabia. The previous record was 51.7°C (125.1°F), at Abqaiq, date unknown. The record heat was accompanied by a sandstorm, which caused eight power plants to go offline, resulting in blackouts to several Saudi cities.

Chad had its hottest day in history on June 22, 2010, when the temperature reached 47.6°C (117.7°F) at Faya. The previous record was 47.4°C (117.3°F) at Faya on June 3 and June 9, 1961, but old readings at this station, particularly in the 1950s, were affected by over-exposure of the instrument to sun.

Kuwait recorded its hottest temperature in history on June 15 in Abdaly, according to the Kuwait Met office. The mercury hit 52.6°C (126.7°F). Kuwait's previous all-time hottest temperature was 51.9°C (125.4°F), on July 27,2007, at Abdaly. Temperatures reached 51°C (123.8°F) in the capital of Kuwait City on June 15, 2010. There were some readings as high as 54°C at Mitribah this summer, but the intrument there was found to be out of calibration.

Iraq had its hottest day in history on June 14, 2010, when the mercury hit 52.0°C (125.6°F) in Basra. Iraq's previous record was 51.7°C (125.1°F) set August 8, 1937, in Ash Shu'aybah.

Pakistan had its hottest temperature in history on May 26, when the mercury hit an astonishing 53.5°C (128.3°F) at the town of MohenjuDaro, according to the Pakistani Meteorological Department. While this temperature reading must be reviewed by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for authenticity, not only is the 128.3°F reading the hottest temperature ever recorded in Pakistan, it is the hottest reliably measured temperature ever recorded on the continent of Asia. The old Pakistani record was 52.8°C (127°F) at Jacobabad in 1919.

Myanmar (Burma) had its hottest temperature in its recorded history on May 14, when the mercury hit 47.2°C (117.0°F) in Myinmu. This broke the record of 47.0°C set at the same location two days previous (May 12.) Myanmar's previous hottest temperature was 46.0°C (114.4°F) at Magwe in May, 1980. According to Chris Burt, author of the authoritative weather records book Extreme Weather, the 47.2°C measured this year is the hottest temperature in Southeast Asia history.

Ascension Island (St. Helena, a U.K. Territory) had its hottest temperature in history on March 25, 2010, when the mercury hit 34.9°C (94.8°F) at Georgetown. The previous record was 34.0°C (93.2°F) at Georgetown in April 2003, exact day unknown.

The Solomon Islands had their hottest temperature in history on February 1, 2010, when the mercury hit 36.1°C (97°F) at Honiara Henderson. The previous record for the Solomon Islands was 35.6°C (96.0°F) at Honaiara, date unknown.

Colombia had its hottest reliably measured temperature in history on January 24, 2010, when Puerto Salgar hit 42.3°C (108°F). The previous record was 42.0°C (107.6°F) at El Salto in March 1988 and April 1998 (exact day unknown.)

Also Notable
China set its all-time heat record for an inhabited place on June 20, 2010, when the mercury hit 48.7°C (119.7°F) at Toyoq. The all-time heat record for China is 49.7°C (121.5°F) on August 3, 2008 at the Aydingkol automatic weather station at the uninhabited Ading Lake in the Turfan Depression in Northwest China.

Martinique, an island in the Caribbean that is a French territory, set what may be its hottest reliably measured temperature record in September, when the mercury hit 36.2°C (97.2°F) at Francois Chopotte. The current all-time record is 36.5°C (97.7°F) in April 1983 at St. Pierre Observatory, but this measurement was taken with older equipment that may not be reliable.

The occupied west bank of Palestine, the portion of Israel that declared independence in 1988 but is not recognized by all nations as a sovereign country, recorded its hottest temperature in history on August 7, 2010, when the temperature hit 51.4°C (124.5°F) at Kibbutz Almog (also called Qalya or Kalya) in the Jordan Valley. The previous record for this portion of Israel was set on June 22, 1942, at the same location.

All-time national heat records were missed by 1°C or less in many other nations this summer, including the Azores, Morocco, Estonia, and Latvia.

Extensive credit for researching these records goes to weather records researcher Maximiliano Herrera, who maintains a comprehensive set of extreme temperature records on his web site.

Next update
I'll have an update Saturday morning.

Jeff Masters

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Good afternoon...

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Now this is the kind of thing that can get Florida a big hit. See that ridge north of Richard on the 12z GFS? That has Florida's name all over it.

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Quoting sailingallover:
There is an old sailors rule of thumb when the second cold front passes completely over FL hurricane season is over....
Now maybe not.. but I'm going to say that the front going over now is going to do a lot to cool off water temps..
So Chances of a big hit for CONUS are will be dropping fast..


I would agree, with the exception of Florida, which can still be hit by big ones right through October. The water will remain warm there with the Loop Current and the Gulf Stream.

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That cool dry air after Wilma sure was nice for sleeping with the power out.
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Quoting ChillinInTheKeys:



Might want to throw in some other variables such as how far out the different velocities of wind extend from the center. It seems to me that a small storm like Andrew should have a much lower ACE at the same SS catagory as say a Gilbert.
IKE (Integrated Kinetic Energy) does that, but leaves out central pressure. I'd say it is a far more useful measure than ACE, but, again, due to lacking historic obs, we'll never have a good IKE calculation from before the time of HHs with SFMR.
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Quoting CybrTeddy:


IIRC Wilma hit when the 3rd cold front hit Florida.
Yeah, but he said all the way through Fl. That cold front after Wilma was the first one to reach the Fl. Keys.
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Quoting Neapolitan:


My take on it has been that ACE should be based on an algorithmic combination of both wind speed and central pressure, since there are times when one indicates a stronger storm than the other, and vice versa. Such a system would compensate for the odd fluctuations in one metric or the other that happen from time to time, smoothing out the highs and lows and making for a more consistently accurate and precise snapshot of a system's strength at any given point in time.



Might want to throw in some other variables such as how far out the different velocities of wind extend from the center. It seems to me that a small storm like Andrew should have a much lower ACE at the same SS catagory as say a Gilbert.
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Quoting OneDrop:
That's what I call dedication. I've surfed there quite a few times and it gets good. I can't imagine 10-15 footers, must have been nuts!!!
The one thing I noticed was the wave faces were very steep and the tide was low, so if you wiped, you probably hit the sand hard enough to break something...I have done this myself. It is dangerous and it hurts like hell....HHEEEEEREEESSS, Keith..!...I hope..
Member Since: Septiembre 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20506
190. JRRP
TD central atlantic

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Quoting atmoaggie:
But the long range average is tough to have any confidence in. Really, before the time of SFMR and QuikScat, there are lots of storms in which the current listing for maximum wind speeds is a WAG.

If you look closely through our records, many hurricanes had their maximum wind speed at landfall. We know very well, now, that is rarely the case (Andrew, Camille(?), Humberto, Alex, Karl come to mind). The records show this because remote sensing is the only way to determine a max wind speed at sea, most of the time.

I'm with Levi. Central pressure really should be the metric, along with some consideration of wind radii, where reliable. Even with current technology, surface wind obs are a corrupt, variable metric easily effected by, even, marsh grass upwind at the coast, and almost never directly measured at sea. Pressure at landfall is very reliable and the estimation of central pressure by adjusting HH obs in the eye is quite good at sea.


I agree.
Member Since: Julio 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23571
Quoting CybrTeddy:


In the long range average, 2008 and 2010 both count as hyperactive seasons in terms of ACE.
But the long range average is tough to have any confidence in. Really, before the time of SFMR and QuikScat, there are lots of storms in which the current listing for maximum wind speeds is a WAG.

If you look closely through our records, many hurricanes had their maximum wind speed at landfall. We know very well, now, that is rarely the case (Andrew, Camille(?), Humberto, Alex, Karl come to mind). The records show this because remote sensing is the only way to determine a max wind speed at sea, most of the time.

I'm with Levi. Central pressure really should be the metric, along with some consideration of wind radii, where reliable. Even with current technology, surface wind obs are a corrupt, variable metric easily effected by, even, marsh grass upwind at the coast, and almost never directly measured at sea. Pressure at landfall is very reliable and the estimation of central pressure by adjusting HH obs in the eye is quite good at sea.

Trouble still is, and always will be, storms that were not classified in the past at all, much less wind speed max and radii. We'll never have a real solid metric from 80 years ago to try to say anything coherent about one season compared to one back then or individual storms. Sure, the reanalysis project is trying, but there is only so much that can be gleaned from 2 ship obs with winds estimated by Beaufort Scale from a couple of hundred miles away.
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Quoting OneDrop:
Yeah I know I didn't, I was only 19 back then and a total stoner surfer, a Jeff Spicoli if you will. LOL



You say that like it's a bad thing!
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Quoting sailingallover:
There is an old sailors rule of thumb when the second cold front passes completely over FL hurricane season is over....
Now maybe not.. but I'm going to say that the front going over now is going to do a lot to cool off water temps..
So Chances of a big hit for CONUS are will be dropping fast..


IIRC Wilma hit when the 3rd cold front hit Florida.
Member Since: Julio 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23571
Quoting cat5hurricane:

Yeah...GFS 3 to 4 days out has not veered a whole lot much from that situation playing out.


And in a reliable time frame too. If it was like 140+ hours out, I wouldn't have really paid attention. ECMWF ensembles and GFS ensembles both have it too.
CMC now on board with a vengeance.
Link

Member Since: Julio 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23571
There is an old sailors rule of thumb when the second cold front passes completely over FL hurricane season is over....
Now maybe not.. but I'm going to say that the front going over now is going to do a lot to cool off water temps..
So Chances of a big hit for CONUS are will be dropping fast..
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Quoting FLstormwarning:


If you live in FL well then you might have spoke to soon. Next week will be very interesting!


Models are indicating the formation of Richard - but it's way too far out for any confidence in the solutions.
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Quoting weaverwxman:
lovely rita meta maid
looks just like a military man.
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Quoting SOUTHFL43YRS:


Dont bank on it, still another month and 1/2 left.


Meh, I usually just don't even bother with those kinds of posts.
Member Since: Julio 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23571
Quoting PELLSPROG:
Looks like we are finally done with cane season for the US . It's nice not having to mess with the nonsense of shutters and all the generator prep, groceries, and filling the bath tub. Hip hip hooray !!!!!!


Dont bank on it, still another month and 1/2 left.
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lovely rita meta maid
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12z GFS, TS Richard by Tuesday.


Getting excellent consistency.

If this happens, it will be the first use of the 'R' name since Rita.
Member Since: Julio 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23571
Quoting Levi32:


Joe Bastardi pointed out though that if the ACE were based on the storm's central pressure instead of the estimated wind speed, this season would be in 5th place since 1950 right now. It's a good point, because the pressure is a more realistic depiction of how much energy the storm is packing. ACE means Accumulated Cyclone Energy, and we all know that Hurricane Karl at Cat 3 didn't pack as much energy as Hurricane Alex, supposedly a Cat 2. The pressure-based ACE would have accurately reflected that.


My take on it has been that ACE should be based on an algorithmic combination of both wind speed and central pressure, since there are times when one indicates a stronger storm than the other, and vice versa. Such a system would compensate for the odd fluctuations in one metric or the other that happen from time to time, smoothing out the highs and lows and making for a more consistently accurate and precise snapshot of a system's strength at any given point in time.
Member Since: Noviembre 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13457
171. 7544
Quoting FLstormwarning:


No it doesn't? The 06Z and 18Z runs are not good runs. Look at today's 12Z run as it is similar to yesterday's 12Z run.


hmmmm Link
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Looks like we are finally done with cane season for the US . It's nice not having to mess with the nonsense of shutters and all the generator prep, groceries, and filling the bath tub. Hip hip hooray !!!!!!
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Quoting hydrus:
I was at the jetty in Venice the night Keith hit..There were people with there car headlights on the surf, so the people surfing could catch the 10 to 15 footers, that were actually breaking pretty clean.
That's what I call dedication. I've surfed there quite a few times and it gets good. I can't imagine 10-15 footers, must have been nuts!!!
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Quoting CybrTeddy:


In the long range average, 2008 and 2010 both count as hyperactive seasons in terms of ACE.
This wave inn the Central Atlantic is starting to spin up...
Member Since: Septiembre 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20506
Quoting atmoaggie:
So by ACE values in this active period, 2010 would qualify as merely average.
I'd agree.

But, would I have called 2008 average? Closing off local effects would still leave a feeling that it would have been above average.


In the long range average, 2008 and 2010 both count as hyperactive seasons in terms of ACE.
Member Since: Julio 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23571
Quoting sailingallover:

I really thought the ACE would be much higher already..


Joe Bastardi pointed out though that if the ACE were based on the storm's central pressure instead of the estimated wind speed, this season would be in 5th place since 1950 right now. It's a good point, because the pressure is a more realistic depiction of how much energy the storm is packing. ACE means Accumulated Cyclone Energy, and we all know that Hurricane Karl at Cat 3 didn't pack as much energy as Hurricane Alex, supposedly a Cat 2. The pressure-based ACE would have accurately reflected that.
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Quoting MahFL:


I hope you did not marry that one ?
Yeah I know I didn't, I was only 19 back then and a total stoner surfer, a Jeff Spicoli if you will. LOL
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Quoting atmoaggie:
So by ACE values in this active period, 2010 would qualify as merely average.
I'd agree.

But, would I have called 2008 average? Closing off local effects would still leave a feeling that it would have been above average.

I really thought the ACE would be much higher already..
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Good morning all.

Tropical Tidbit for Friday, October 15th, with Video
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Quoting OneDrop:
I remember well, my GF almost broke up with me because I was 30 minutes late to Thanksgiving dinner. Surfed a south swell in the morning and a north swell in the evening at Singer Island.
I was at the jetty in Venice the night Keith hit..There were people with there car headlights on the surf, so the people surfing could catch the 10 to 15 footers, that were actually breaking pretty clean.
Member Since: Septiembre 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20506
158. MahFL
Quoting OneDrop:
I remember well, my GF almost broke up with me because I was 30 minutes late to Thanksgiving dinner. Surfed a south swell in the morning and a north swell in the evening at Singer Island.


I hope you did not marry that one ?
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Quoting atmoaggie:
So by ACE values in this active period, 2010 would qualify as merely average.
I'd agree.

ACE-wise, the 1995-2009 average was 138, while the median was 145 (thanks in very large part to '95, '03, and '05). We're at 142 now, with more to come. On the other hand, the 1950 through 2009 average was 101, and the median over that period was 88, so we are substantially above those.

Storm wise:

15-year average (95-09): 14/7.4/3.8
15-year median (95-09): 14/8/3
60-year average (50-09): 10/6.2/2.7
60-year median (50-09): 11/6/2
2010 (still in progress): 16/9/5

FWIW, 2005 accumulated close to 30% of its ACE on or after October 15. Were that to happen this year, we'd end up with 185 or so.

Still sticking with my original 20/12/6 (I've a feeling we'll see three more storms in October, and another one or two down the road a ways) with an ACE of 170-180.
Member Since: Noviembre 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13457
Quoting clwstmchasr:


Thanksgiving 1988 Tropical storm Keith hit the Tampa Bay Area with 70mph winds.
I remember well, my GF almost broke up with me because I was 30 minutes late to Thanksgiving dinner. Surfed a south swell in the morning and a north swell in the evening at Singer Island.
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155. MahFL
Quoting Bordonaro:

OK, GFS, GEM, EMCWF, NCEP & NOGAPS all develop a Caribbean system over the next 7 days.


But it misses FL , and goes out to sea ?
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Quoting atmoaggie:
So by ACE values in this active period, 2010 would qualify as merely average.
I'd agree.

But, would I have called 2008 average? Closing off local effects would still leave a feeling that it would have been above average.


Good point... It would be tough to call the year with Gustav, Ike and Paloma merely average...

But, the same could be said for 2007, with Dean and Felix being so big... yet that was way below average for the active period since 1995....

Hmmm...
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Quoting rmbjoe1954:


I think the season is determined to go out with a bang!
iam hoping its not to big of a bang winters coming gonna get cool and with no roof well ya get the picture
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Quoting TampaTom:
2010 is so close to passing 2008 for ACE...

The ACE ratings for the seasons since 1995:

2005 - 248
1995 - 228
2004 - 225
1998 - 182
1999 - 187
2003 - 175
2008 - 145
2010 - 142
2000 - 116
2001 - 106
2006 - 79
2007 - 72
2002 - 65
1996 - 53
2009 - 51
1997 - 40

CONUS got sooo lucky this year!
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150. MahFL
I saw some geese flying south for the winter, in the classic V formation, over downtown JAX. Do they know it's going to be a harsh winter ?
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Quoting scott39:
Yea, We already have a "little Richard"!


And what's the nickname for Richard?

Oh yeah, "Ricky". lol
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Quoting TampaTom:
2010 is so close to passing 2008 for ACE...

The ACE ratings for the seasons since 1995:

2005 - 248
1995 - 228
2004 - 225
1998 - 182
1999 - 187
2003 - 175
2008 - 145
2010 - 142
2000 - 116
2001 - 106
2006 - 79
2007 - 72
2002 - 65
2009 - 51
1997 - 40
So by ACE values in this active period, 2010 would qualify as merely average.
I'd agree.

But, would I have called 2008 average? Closing off local effects would still leave a feeling that it would have been above average.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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