The Northeast Weather Blog...

Unusual warm again and tropical trouble...

By: Blizzard92, 8:19 PM GMT en Agosto 28, 2010

In a few short days the meteorological summer will be only a recent memory. It is already evident seasonal changes are quickly abrupt considering darkness arrives before 8pm allowing for shorter days. Nights are starting too cool off as the first 30s and 40s have appeared for many areas already. Morning fog is also a typical morning nuisance as common with the Fall season courtesy of differing land/water temperatures from radiational cooling. Summer 2010 will be defined as a very hot summer setting many records across the eastern seaboard. After the anomalous snowfall of February 2010, monthly temperature anomalies have been a constant above normal.

KMDT...
March- (+5.8F)
April- (+4.1F)
May- (+3.0F)
June- (+4.1F)
July- (+3.4F)
August- (+1.9F) Preliminary

Scores of high temperatures have been broken across the Northeast as temperatures soared into the 100s for the first time for many areas since 2002. For many, July 6 was the peak of the heat with most ASOS stations reporting temperatures of 100F or higher. My PWS even reached 101F, the highest since the station has been automated back in 2007.


Fig. 1- Unlike many heatwaves for the eastern US which derive out of the southwest, these abnormal thickness developed from a bubble of high pressure (heat dome) directly over the Middle Atlantic. Therefore the eastern US featured the highest temperatures and the Midwest avoided the heatwave. This was common for many of the heatwaves this summer, but this particular map above is thickness from July 6.

This abnormal warmth can likely be directly correlated to a very unusually warm winter in Canada. General jet stream wavelengths favor airmasses moving from Canada into the United States for most seasons because our trade winds blow west to east in this part of the hemisphere. Canada featured one of its warmest winters on record with a very low snow cover and depth nationwide. Alaska also featured a very mild winter with even only 22in of snow in Fairbanks, AK. Therefore there has been very little cool air in Canada to alleviate the abnormal warmth downstream in the United States. While a few backdoor cold fronts did occur sparking some severe weather, in general the progression of cold frontal passages through the Middle Atlantic was below normal. But the summer of 2010 has allowed for a bit of cooling in the Arctic despite continuing sea ice melting, including the opening of the Northwest Passage.


Fig. 2- Current sea ice levels remain similar to numbers at this current time last year.

As we wrap-up discussions on the abnormal warmth in the northern Middle Atlantic, another five day heatwave bears down on the east coast. Current H85 thermals progged from the GFS indicate a pocket of x>20C temperatures during the peak of the heat Wednesday and Thursday. While the availability of the heat begins to become more limited as we enter September, a few records remain in the upper 90s to 100F for this time period, so abnormal warmth is certainly not unprecidented. The upcoming period will be hot, but with dry humidity levels. PWATs aloft and H7 moisture anomalies will remain very low all week and the flow out of the southwest from the Gulf of Mexico remains interrupted. Therefore humidity levels will stay low allowing dewpoints to remain in the 50s and 60s. Therefore these dewpoints combined with temperatures in the low 90s will actually make it feel slightly cooler on the body. Heat indices will be in the upper 80s to 90F all week, despite a few locations that could see high temperatures top 95F especially towards Washington DC. These 90F days will just adding to the impressive of 90F highs this year which is already topping 30 here in Harrisburg. Current MOS output forecast highs for Washington DC for upcoming days...

Sunday~ 90F
Monday~ 95F

The forecast remains simple for the Sunday through Thursday time frame for all areas.... sunshine with patchy morning fog with lows in the 50s, followed by increasing heat with highs near or slightly above 90F. Elevations above 2000ft will remain in the mid to upper 80s.

A dry cold front passes through Thursday night alleviating this abnormal warmth and probably making this 5-day heat wave, the last of its kind for another many months.


Fig. 3- Current GFS/ECMWF 10-day median thickness anomalies indicate possible troughing over the East Coast towards early to mid September. In fact at this point, it appears temperatures may be on the cool side towards Labor Day.

By the end of the month though I do expect September to probably range ~(+)1F above normal for most areas temperature wise with below normal precipitation.


Fig. 4- 12z ECMWF ensembles continue to indicate a negative west based NAO, but NAO affects as far as Northeast troughing usually do not directly correlate until October onward through winter. The NAO has relatively limited effects during the summer for boundary layer temperatures. For instance most of the summer has featured above normal temperatures despite a negative NAO most of the summer.

With ridging over most of the east coast (note the building of a possible southeast ridge already), most areas in the next two weeks will feature above normal temperatures with a possible quick reprieve of cooler temperatures around Labor Day. Also conditions look abnormally dry. Current 28 August 2010 12utc GFS only prints out .17in for KMDT in the 16-day QPF meteogram.

Finally while the boring weather pattern continues for the northern Middle Atlantic, the tropics begin to pose a possible threat to the east coast. Hurricane Danielle will continue to swirl swinging well offshore from Bermuda. Despite this the increasing surf will be common along the eastern seaboard and here in the northern Middle Atlantic along the Delaware and Maryland shorelines. WaveWatchIII model indicates swells on the order of 5-7ft for Atlantic coastlines in Maryland and Delaware. This will cause a bit of beach erosion and an increased rip current threat. The tropical system Earl is shortly behind Danielle and will come slightly closer to the East Coast, but a trough moving through the NOCONUS will aid in swinging the storm system likely between Bermuda and the United States. Recent GFS prognostics have occasionally hinted at a close proximity of Earl and areas such as Cape Cod, but I think the model is not swinging the trough through fast enough. At this time I think the main threats will be beach erosion and increased surf as this storm too, passes well offshore. Still though as anything with tropics, it remains highly uncertain. Finally 97L will likely be named Fiona in the coming days and will follow a track south of its formers. This will take it very close to the Antilles posing another tropical threat to those islands after Earl. During that time the synoptic wavelength pattern favors a southeast ridge over the eastern United States with a weak trough over the extreme northern Great Lakes moving east. This remains nearly 10-days out, but the general pattern can already be highlighted. This storm bares monitoring a bit more closely for those along the East Coast as several ECMWF runs have noted possible landfalls for the east coast from Fiona. It is all a matter of timing and whether the storm can pick up the weakeness in the trough to be carried northward. But what the ECMWF has been noting along with the ECMWF ensembles is that Fiona tracks far enough south to avoid the trough posing a threat to the Southeast and then tracking north and swinging up the coast.


Fig. 5- Current 28 August 2010 12utc 240hr ECMWF featuring South Carolina landfall of Fiona.

Right now historical odds actually do not favor a landfall based on the current position of 97L. But still those along the eastern seaboard will need to monitor this system closely. At this point I am not making any forecast as it remains well off in the distance, but it certainly has grabbed my attention if that means anything. None the less the three tropical system wills eventually make their way towards the North Atlantic shipping lanes. The tracks of these systems will likely cause a dramatic cooling of the anomalous warm Atlantic SSTs. Also these storms as the increase in altitude, may affect teleconnections and upstream blocking in this region. This may cause a few variables in the long term weather pattern; stay tuned. For now those along the East Coast can at the minimum expect increased surf, slight beach erosion, and a high threat of rip currents. I will have more on the tropical threat later this week. For now enjoy the 5-day heatwave and sunshine this week with dry weather.

Regional updating radar...


"Here north of Harrisburg 2010 statistics"
(Severe Weather Stats...)
Severe Thunderstorm Watches- 11
Severe Thunderstorm Warnings- 10
Tornado Watches- 1
Tornado Warnings- 1
Total Thunderstorms- 17

(Precipitation Stats...)
Flood Watches- 3
Flood Warnings- 2
Monthly Precipitation- 0.00inches
Yearly Precipitation- 26.54inches

(Temperature Stats...)
Heat Advisories- 5
Excessive Heat Watches- 1
Excessive Heat Warnings- 1
90degree days- 37
Highest Temperature 101F (x2)

Weather Pattern Observations

Updated: 9:34 PM GMT en Septiembre 08, 2010

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Cutoff low progresses northeastward...

By: Blizzard92, 12:29 AM GMT en Agosto 23, 2010

As another month ticks by on the intangible figment of time, another summer ceases to an close. By this midpoint in the year, many New Year's Resolutions have been broken, and summer vacation for students and teaches resume another year. Across the northern portions of North America, the seasonal transition is already evident. While no the leaves are not red and the snow has not fallen, but suddle changes are evident. The days grow shorter with the darkness of night already noticeable by 7pm and patchy ground fog resumes the typical fall like pattern during the early morning hours. Cold fronts now blow across the region evident in not only wind shifts, but temperatures. Instead of only a relaxation of humidity after a frontal passing, finally cooler temperatures are trickling in. We have passed the dog days of summer. And we have passed those 'wall of humidity' days. But now we enter a new chapter. While one could say every year this transition occurs, but unlike many things... the weather is never replicated. Increasing changes bring turmoil in the meteorology community as challenges impose. Skills in one set of forecasting weaken, while others strengthen. Autumn, while typically boring weatherwise, offers a renewed interest in winter forecasting. Rarely during the Summer months is a collaboration of model guidance such as the CMC, JMA, ECMWF, GFS, NAM, WRF, UKMET used in one setting. Fall allows for a resurgence of an active northerly jet that sinks southward into the lower 48. One could say forecasting thunderstorms is difficult as exact placement of rain vs. no rain is impossible at this point in time, but winter brings challenges like no other. Low pressure systems develop across the entire region affecting millions of people in the United States from flooding rains to blowing snow to slippery ice. So as the meteorological Summer closes August 31... another chapter in the endless meteorological notebook begins.

Like most any summer, the typical local news report of flash flooding occuring somewhere in the United States is common. Turn on the six o'clock news and a headline of flash flooding in Iowa or Arkansas or New York State or wherever... is expected. Flash flooding is second to heat in the number of weather-related deaths in the United States. This is probable due to most areas being in precipitation favored zones outside, say Death Valley. But a probable cause in the increasing flash flooding is not weather related at all. In fact many of these flash flood events likely could have been prevented in certain situations. The volume of water world wide remains a general steady constant. But any large rate of precipitation in a short period of time is a catalyst for flash flooding. With increasing urban sprawl, asphalt and concrete are quickly tearing away at Earth's natural filter... soil. As precipitation falls on asphalt, there is essentially no place to go, other than evaporation. It becomes runoff causing the ponding of water. Urban flooding is one of the leading causes of flooding deaths due to the ignorance of the 'turn around don't drown' philosophy. Also the disruption of streams, rivers, and topography displaces the natural flow of runoff precipitation in the soil. Recent years have acknowledged this problem with the advent of retention ponds, but the problem still remains a major concern. Take a typical thunderstorm... 30 minutes with about .75in of rain or so. 0.75in of rain over an area the size of a county covers a great deal of land primarily being soil (outside the major cities). But with urbanized areas this three quarters of an inch has no where to go other than drainage systems which often are clogged during Spring and Fall with debris. So a simple 0.75 reaks unnecessary havoc and minor flooding with ponding along roadways. This raises the question... Are flash floods really on the increase? Again that is one of those questions such as, "If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?" Yes flash flooding reports are increasing, but the volume of rain essentially is remaining a constant. Therefore the atmosphere is not necessarily responsible for the increasing reports, but more so they are increasing because of the growing population and growing human influence on the environment. Sure it is easy to blame mother Earth for a problem, but blaiming ourselves... well that is another story.

The week ahead looks rather benign weatherwise as soon as the interesting cutoff low in New England progresses northeast slowly. The cold front had already reached the I-95 corridor as of 8pm Sunday evening and the low pressure is churning up the East Coast.

Dry air aloft associated with a weak upper level circulation in southern Quebec is penetrating the troposphere in the Northern Middle Atlantic acting as an area of subsidence preventing additional rainfall for most areas Sunday night. But a weak banana high over Newfoundland will keep the low pressure in the vicinity through Monday night. As the winds back around the cutoff low, increasing PWATs will once again occur Monday. +1SD precipitate waters near 1.7in are progged on the H7 GFS moisture fields allowing the mention of precipitation in the forecast through Monday night. As the onshore easterly flow increases by Monday morning, low stratus will advect 1000ft or less ceilings into areas downwind of the Appalachians with an increasing threat of drizzle and light rain showers. HIRES NMM QPF levels add an additional 0.1-0.25in of rain regionwide on Monday with the higher amounts located over northeastern Pennsylvania. GFS QPF values remain similar also. A dreary forecast looks in store for most areas through Tuesday afternoon especially east of the Hagerstown-State College-Lock Haven line with drizzle and light rain along with patchy fog and low clouds. IFR conditions will be prevalent especially towards the coastal plain in Delaware, southeastern Pennsylvania, and Maryland. Marine influences will remain unfavorable for recreational use as the onshore flow will add the potential for a bit of oversplashing in favorable coastal flood locations along the Chesapeake Bay. 18utc 8/22/10 GFS also adds an interesting scenario on Wednesday with a weak coastal low forming along the quasi-stationary boundary in Virginia. This low then traverses northward with heavy rain into southern New England.

At this point my initial thoughts are that this could be a convective feedback problem, but the last few NAM runs have hinted at this scenario with a very minimal and weak 850hPa low in this region in the same time frame. In any case an unsettled approach to the forecast is the smart way to go for all areas through Wednesday evening. Temperatures are also below normal for a change courtesy of the stratiform rain. 24hr temperature changes from yesterday to today feature a widespread -10F departure for most areas.

By Wednesday night an anti-cyclinic flow resumes over the entire Northeast featuring a relative period of beautiful weather. Lower 80s and sunshine will be common Thursday through Saturday along with dewpoints in the 60s maintaining lower humidity. Looking at the long term patter, GFS and ECMWF collaborations are both initiating once again a strong ridging pattern with anomalous H85 thermals over the East Coast in the two week time frame from this current date.

At this point in time model guidance is likely struggling with the seasonal transition and probably is overestimating the amount of warmth. Longer wavelengths globally do not support ECMWF guidance in this period. While above temperatures are possible, these progged thermals would initiate record warmth in the mid 90s or so. While 90s are possible in any September, they are not the common place they once were in July and August. My thoughts in this time period feature above normal temperatures towards early to mid September, but nothing abnormal or above 92F or so. At this point the GFS maintains a semi-active jet flow in the Middle Atlantic, so precipitation anomalies should remain near normal in this time period also.

Monday- Drizzle and light rain regionwide with low stratus and cooler temperatures in the mid to upper 70s. Additional rainfall for most areas near .25in.

Tuesday- Mostly cloudy to cloudy with light rain, especially for areas in the east. Additional rainfall less than one tenth of an inch. Highs remain below normal in the mid to upper 70s. A few areas in western Pennsylvania may tap into some sunshine with highs in the 80s.

Wednesday- Improving conditions with clouds finally dissipating for eastern areas with sunshine by evening. Little to no additional rainfall. Temperatures near normal in the low to mid 80s.

Thursday- High pressures dominates the weather pattern with brilliant sunshine and a cool/dry northwest flow. High temperatures in the low 80s.

Friday- Remains a repeat of Thursday with high pressure in control and brilliant sunshine regionwide. Highs near to slightly below normal.

Saturday/Sunday- Sunshine dominates the weather pattern with a bit warmer temperatures in the mid to upper 80s, especially on Sunday.

Regional updating radar...


"Here north of Harrisburg 2010 statistics"
(Severe Weather Stats...)
Severe Thunderstorm Watches- 11
Severe Thunderstorm Warnings- 10
Tornado Watches- 1
Tornado Warnings- 1
Total Thunderstorms- 17

(Precipitation Stats...)
Flood Watches- 3
Flood Warnings- 2
Monthly Precipitation- 4.24inches
Yearly Precipitation- 26.54inches

(Temperature Stats...)
Heat Advisories- 5
Excessive Heat Watches- 1
Excessive Heat Warnings- 1
90degree days- 31
Highest Temperature 101F (x2)

Weekly Forecast

Updated: 12:45 AM GMT en Agosto 26, 2010

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Unsettled weather ahead...

By: Blizzard92, 10:01 PM GMT en Agosto 13, 2010

I find myself often asked by many, "Why do you like the weather?" Of course one would think it is a simple question with a simple answer as something like because of "tornadoes and hurricanes." But my passion for the weather is far beyond the instances of severe weather and destruction. I cannot pinpoint a day, time, of year where I developed an interest for the atmosphere, climate, and weather, but since elementary school I have been the go to person for checking the weather. Like many sciences, meteorology is a growing field with a wealth of knowledge yet to be gained and understood. In fact the advent of technology such as the media and internet have brought about radical changes in forecasting just in the past decade. And now in an ever important decade focused on climate change, the weather is a growing and developing topic for many. It is often thought of as a converstation starter and is discussed by everyone. I can remember watching the 2003 President's Day snowstorm interviews on The Weather Channel with Paul Kocin. I can remember the exact snowfall forecast map with 2ft+ progged for central Pennsylvania. And yes I can remember as a mere toddler pulling my sled along the massive snow 'walls' from the snowplow after the January of 96' blizzard. And now as my adventure slings towards college and soon real world job application in my field, I find it ever important to not only understand the basis of the atmosphere, but to apply it to new theories. A scientific field cannot grow without research and development and more theological applications. Meteorology is the understanding of the science and application to using the knowledge to the benefit of the general public's wellfare. I was even asked many times, "Why do you not want to use your intelligence to be a doctor or lawyer?" Most of the times unfortunately, people often equivalent meteorology to the weatherman on TV. But atmospheric sciences is a difficult field that actually benefits society in many ways beyond the simple weatherman/green screen. It is a science based on calculus equations and physics theorys. In the end, I know how fortunate I have been. To be able to reach a lifelong passion at a young age is a often jealous and fortunate attribute. There is certainly no hesistation in "What do you want to be when you grow up?"

A common occurence in the typical Middle Atlantic summer... Two week long dry period then followed by a month's worth of rain in a short period of time. This is the definitive catalyst for flash flooding with the common season being Summer. The common setup... stalled front, increasing PWATs aloft enhanced by tropical moisture, and wave of low pressure along quasi-stationary boundary. Combine these dynamics with surface instability and boom... you have slow moving thunderstorms with an abundance of moisture. FFG remains about normal, with higher numbers in western Pennsylvania.

But despite what FFG shows, 3in of rain in less than an hour is going to cause problems wherever. KCXY reported 3.01in of rain in one hour on August 12, 2010 from a collection of slow moving thunderstorms associated with an MCV. For more information on the flash flood event... Link. The upcoming week will feature a period of unsettled weather across the entire northern Middle Atlantic. High pressure located over the southern Canadian maritimes a weak southeast ridging will create a squeeze play for a slow moving front to stall near and just to the south of the I-81 corridor. Anomalous moisture out of the Gulf of Mexico courtesy of the remnants of the recent tropical depression will set up the catalyst for an abundance of showers and thunderstorms daily along the quasi-stationary boundary. This puts the southern half of Pennsylvania and all of Maryland and Delaware at risk for unsettled weather from Sunday through Friday. The ECMWF will score high on verification charts, highlighting this threat for nearly a week. In fact in correlation with a few convective feedback errors, at one point ECMWF runs were printing our nearly 3-5in of rain for the upcoming week over eastern portions of the northern Middle Atlantic. While everyday will feature scattered showers and thunderstorms, not all areas will receieve rain. In fact there may be areas that receive little to no rain this week, while others see an additional 3in or so. So the typical forecast will suffice each day this week...

Cloudy with a chance of showers and thunderstorms. Storms may be produce heavy rain. Highs in the 70s to low 80s.

Any breaks in the clouds should be enough in the thermodyamic field to produce some SBCAPE along with tapping the shearing winds aloft enough to produce a wet microburst or two. Isolated severe weather will be a threat each day with the highest threat on Monday.

Difficult but simple forecast essentially for the following week. At least temperatures will remain normal to below normal extinguishing at least the heat wave threat for now. Alright the rest of the blog will be a bit of a rant I need to get off my chest... Every morning I follow a simple routine, shower then read the newspaper. I am always a bit surprised in the editorial section with articles on climate change. While I find it great people are taking an interest in protecting the unique planet of Earth, it is easier said than done. The May through August time period has been dominated by lag effects from one of the strongest El Ninos on record. ENSO lag effects often occur months later despite shifts in SST anomalies; meaning despite current La Nina characteristics, the boundary layer atmosphere remains having the effects from the El Nino several months ago. A quick basis in the ENSO knowledge data base quickly advects the idea of warmer than normal surface temperatures globally. In fact the 1998 El Nino correlated with some of the warmest temperatures globally on record. Then as the El Nino diminished, so did Earth's temperatures resulting a decade of slightly cooler temperatures 2000-2010. Anti-anthropogenic global warming advocates are quickly to announce cooling, but take away 98' and essentially there has not been much cooling or warming in the past decade. 2010 will be up there in terms of warmest years on record globally, but it is another anomaly. The excuse that the Moscow droughts and heatwaves are correlated with global warming, just does not have enough evidence. It would be the same for me to gesture the anomalous snowfall on the east coast in the United States is evidence global warming does not exist. Short term weather disasters provide very little evidence for either arguement. It is irrelevant to argue the anomalous weather in 2010 is evidence of anything other than a tumultuous habitat of planet Earth that date centuries before.

While yes we can change our lightbulbs to CFLs, or buy a hybrid car, but how much of a difference is that going to make. Lag effects in stratospheric temperatures have been proven to date nearly 50-100 years; meaning whatever effects CO2 levels currently is having on the Earth, we will not see for many years. Yes I think it is important for climatological awareness, but more public knowledge is necessary before blanket statements are juxtaposed.

Regional updating radar...


"Here north of Harrisburg 2010 statistics"
(Severe Weather Stats...)
Severe Thunderstorm Watches- 11
Severe Thunderstorm Warnings- 10
Tornado Watches- 1
Tornado Warnings- 1
Total Thunderstorms- 17

(Precipitation Stats...)
Flood Watches- 3
Flood Warnings- 2
Monthly Precipitation- 3.58inches
Yearly Precipitation- 25.88inches

(Temperature Stats...)
Heat Advisories- 5
Excessive Heat Watches- 1
Excessive Heat Warnings- 1
90degree days- 31
Highest Temperature 101F (x2)

Hydrology Concerns

Updated: 9:58 PM GMT en Agosto 16, 2010

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Observation Blog...

By: Blizzard92, 1:14 PM GMT en Agosto 07, 2010

Quiet weather in store for the next few days as weak dominate troughing and high pressure remain in control maintaining seasonable to slightly below normal temperatures and lower humidity values. A few backdoor cold fronts will approach northern Pennsylvania early next week, but most areas will remain dry.

"Current Temperature"


"Current Dewpoint"


"Current Surface Map and Weekly History of Jet Stream Position"


"Regional Radar"


"Regional Satellite"


"Regional Advisories"


"Soil Moisture Anomalies and 5-day Precipitation Amounts from Hydro Prediction Center"


"Severe Weather Outlooks from Storm Prediction Center Days 1, 2, and 3"


"12hr Estimated Precipitation"


"Forecast Max Temperatures"


"Forecast Min Temperature"


"Forecast Weather at 2pm"


"Current Storm Reports"


"Fire Outlooks from Storm Prediction Center Days 1, 2, and 3"

(All maps courtesy of NOAA and Penn State Meteo.)

"Forecast Model Links"
-NAM model 12z...Link
-GFS model 12z...Link
-NMM model 12z...Link
-SREF model 9z...Link

"Severe Weather Links"
-Atmospheric Soundings Skewt T charts...Link
-SPC Mesoscale Analysis Pages...Link
-Public Spotter Reports for State College NWS...Link
-Severe Weather Model Forecast indices...Link
-Severe Weather Parameter Definitions...Link

"Flooding Links"
-Automated Pennsylvania Rainfall Recording Stations...Link
-Flash Flooding Guidance...Link
-HPC Forecasts for Excessive Rainfall...Link
-Hydrology Predictions for Lakes, Rivers, and Streams...Link

I will be away from August 7 - August 11 visiting Cornell University and SUNY Oswego. This is an observation blog where there are automatically updating maps. Feel free to leave comments below and daily observations are welcomed. Back to regular blogging a few days after I return. Have a wonderful week!!!

"Here north of Harrisburg 2010 statistics"
(Severe Weather Stats...)
Severe Thunderstorm Watches- 10
Severe Thunderstorm Warnings- 9
Tornado Watches- 1
Tornado Warnings- 1
Total Thunderstorms- 16

(Precipitation Stats...)
Flood Watches- 3
Flood Warnings- 2
Monthly Precipitation- 2.67inches
Yearly Precipitation- 24.97inches

(Temperature Stats...)
Heat Advisories- 5
Excessive Heat Watches- 1
Excessive Heat Warnings- 1
90degree days- 31
Highest Temperature 101F (x2)

Observation Blogs

Updated: 12:50 AM GMT en Agosto 13, 2010

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About Blizzard92

Cornell University- Atmospheric Sciences Undergrad; Research Assist.- Onset of Spring Indices Toolbox; Interests- Small spatial scale climatolology

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Linglestown, PA
Elevation: 520 ft
Temperatura: 24.2 ° F
Punto de rocío: 15.2 ° F
Humedad: 68%
Viento: Sin viento
Ráfagas de viento: 9.0 mph
Updated: 10:37 AM EST en Enero 18, 2014

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